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Four Pillars and Ten Key Values

Posted in on Oct 22, 2009 with No Comments →

The international Green Party movement is guided by the “Four Pillars”: Ecological Wisdom, Social Justice, Grassroots Democracy, and Nonviolence. Greens in the United States add six more — Decentralization, Community-Based Economics, Feminism, Respect for Diversity, Personal and Global Responsibility, and Future Focus/Sustainability — to form the “Ten Key Values”.

Ecological Wisdom

A healthy society cannot exist without a healthy environment-all things are interconnected and interdependent. Both nature and humanity are worthy of respect and freedom from exploitation.

Social Justice

Greens want to replace the worldwide system of poverty and injustice with a world free of all oppression based on class, gender, race, citizenship, age, or sexual orientation.

Grassroots Democracy

Greens believe in direct participation by all people in the environmental, political, and economic decisions that affect their lives. In practice, Greens make decisions by voluntary consensus whenever possible.

Nonviolence

Greens promote nonviolent methods to oppose practices and policies with which we disagree, and guide our actions toward lasting community and global peace.

Decentralization

Greens support a restructuring of social, political and economic institutions away from a system which is controlled by and mostly benefits the powerful few, to a democratic, less bureaucratic system.

Community-Based Economics

Greens seek an economics based upon the natural limits of the Earth which meets the basic needs of everyone on the planet. We value people over profits, when the two conflict.

Feminism

Greens acknowledge the importance of both men and women and their unique capacities. Both sexes are critical to creating a healthy, sustainable society. We actively promote cooperation and participation to further our goals.

Respect for Diversity

Greens believe it is important to value cultural, ethnic, racial, sexual, religious and spiritual diversity, and to promote the development of respectful relationships across these lines.

Personal and Global Responsibility

Greens demonstrate a commitment to global sustainability and international justice through political solidarity and in personal lifestyles of self-sufficiency. We believe in the slogan “Think globally, act locally.”

Future Focus/Sustainability

We must counter-balance the drive for short-term profits by assuring that development, technology, and fiscal policies are responsible to future generations.

Green Party Seeks Candidates

Posted in 2018 National & PA State Elections, News on Dec 23, 2017 with Comments Off on Green Party Seeks Candidates

http://www.gp.org/philly_greens_seek_candidates

The Green Party of Philadelphia (GPOP) is seeking candidates to run for elected office in 2018. At their October membership meeting, Philly Greens issued a “Call for Candidates.”

Galen Tyler, Chair of GPOP, said, “Now is the time for people to step up and become leaders of an independent party. The coming year will provide a great opportunity for new candidates to take their first step into political waters. Most Green Party candidates will not be elected on their first campaign for office, but there have been surprises in Philadelphia when a dynamic candidate backed by vigorous volunteers has unseated an incumbent from a corporate party.”

“The Green Party is especially interested in interviewing those who have been traditionally excluded from running as candidates for the two corporate political parties. Our door is open for qualified women, people of color, and LGBTQIA+ and other citizens who agree with the Green Party’s Ten Key Values,” explained Chris Robinson, Green Party Membership Secretary. The Green’s Ten Key Values are ecological wisdom, social justice, nonviolence, grassroots democracy, feminism, future focus, respect for diversity, community-based economics, personal and global responsibility, and decentralization.

“There are several good reasons to run for office,” continued Robinson. “A candidate running for the first time will gain both name recognition and practical experience. They will also have a media soapbox to educate the community around their special issues. In addition, they will be able to pressure the incumbent and give voters a choice, which is so often lacking in Philadelphia.”

During 2018, Representatives in every PA House District will be up for election, as will PA Senators in even-numbered Districts. Candidates seeking these offices must receive the endorsement of registered GPOP members and elected delegates to the Green Party of Pennsylvania (GPPA).

Candidates for PA State Senator must be at least 25 years old, and candidates for PA House of Representatives must be at least 21 years old. Each candidate must have been a resident of PA and a citizen of the U.S. for the last four years, and a resident of the District for the last year. For more information about running for office as a Green Party candidate, please contact Chris Robinson, GPOP Membership Secretary, at 215-843-4256 and gpop@gpop.org.

Green Party candidates for office are coordinated and supported by GPPA Green Wave, a committee which offers a region-based network for candidates. Green Wave officials say that 2018 “could be a great year for local Green wins. Dissatisfaction with the two major parties is at an all-time high and people are looking for change that will bring hope for a peaceful, just, and stable future.”

The Green Party of Philadelphia is an independent political party founded on the four pillars of grassroots democracy, nonviolence, ecological wisdom, and social justice. Follow GPOP on Twitter at @GreenPartyofPHL and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/GreenPartyOfPhiladelphia.
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A similar article appeared in Philly Voice.
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GPOP Statement on Primary Election Results

Posted in 2017 Philadelphia Municipal Elections, News on May 21, 2017 with Comments Off on GPOP Statement on Primary Election Results

Green Party of Philadelphia’s Statement on Tuesday’s Election Results

http://www.gp.org/philly_greens_on_primary_results

With preliminary results of the 2017 Primary Election now in, and given the Democratic Party’s stranglehold on our city’s politics, it is clear that Larry Krasner will be Philadelphia’s next District Attorney. It is the Green Party of Philadelphia’s hope that Krasner will abandon the longstanding pattern of corruption established by our city’s elected officials, as most recently exemplified by our present District Attorney, Seth Williams.

The Green Party of Philadelphia (GPOP, WWW.gpop.org) calls upon Krasner, if elected District Attorney, to bring an end to a criminal justice system that criminalizes poverty and race while letting white-collar corporate crimes go unpunished. The Green Party recognizes that Krasner’s platform includes many reforms which are in line with our party’s key values, and we hope that he honors these pledges in office, specifically:

In a city that is 43% African American, the Green Party calls for a District Attorney who reflects the truth that “Black lives matter” not only in his rhetoric, but also in his actions.
In a city where (according to the ACLU of Pennsylvania) 25% of pedestrian stops by police are made without reasonable suspicion and 80% of those pedestrians are people of color, the Green Party calls for a District Attorney who will push for an end to stop-and-frisk and who will refuse to bring cases resulting from these illegal, racist practices.
Only a few weeks after Philadelphia police arrested 22 people in Frankford for marijuana, the Green Party calls for an end to the failed War on Drugs and for the legalization of drug possession.
Only days after Philadelphians raised nearly $58,000 for the “Mama’s Bail Out Day” campaign, the Green Party calls for the elimination of a cash bail system that is designed to keep low-income people behind bars.
Finally, the Green Party calls for a District Attorney who will never pursue the death penalty – a barbaric practice that brings neither closure nor healing, but only more pain and victims.

In addition to restoring the idea of “justice” to our criminal justice system, Philadelphia’s next District Attorney must guarantee voters’ right to fair elections. We witnessed an astonishing attack of this right in March’s special election in PA House District 197, which was rampant with election fraud and voter intimidation. We demand that the next District Attorney continues the investigation into the special election and takes concrete steps to ensure election integrity.

Finally, we must highlight the urgent need for electoral reform as demonstrated by this election.
Krasner won the primary with 38% of the vote, representing only 6% of the city’s registered voters. A system where a candidate can win office, despite only a minority of voters casting their ballots for him, is an insult to democracy. Therefore, the Green Party calls for Instant Runoff Voting (IRV), where voters rank candidates in their order of preference and a candidate only wins if they obtain majority support.
We must also acknowledge the legalized bribery that is our campaign finance system. Total spending in this election is expected to double what was spent in Philadelphia’s last competitive primary for District Attorney. Indeed, Krasner’s campaign was supported both by grassroots efforts and by a super PAC funded by George Soros; we hope that his actions as District Attorney will be influenced by the people of Philadelphia and not by an outside billionaire. Therefore, the Green Party calls for the full public financing of elections and for stricter limits on campaign spending and contributions.

The Green Party is an independent political party founded on the four pillars of grassroots democracy, nonviolence, ecological wisdom, and social justice. For information about the Green Party of Philadelphia, please call 215-843-4256 or email gpop@gpop.org. Follow us on Twitter and on Facebook.
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This news release also appeared online in Mass Central (Where the Masses Converge).
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Minutes, General Membership Meeting, 11/30

Posted in General Meetings on Dec 06, 2016 with Comments Off on Minutes, General Membership Meeting, 11/30

General Membership Meeting, Minutes
Green Party of Philadelphia (GPOP)
November 30, 2016

Held at A-Space, 4722 Baltimore Avenue, Philadelphia.

Present: Galen Tyler, Taj McGruder, Jerrod Anderson, Amanda Joachim, Olivia Faison, Kevin Bellardine, Andy Cook, Sheila Ptah, Assantewaa Nkrumah-Ture, Martha O’Connell, Willem Foster, Tremaine Lewis, Kentu Malik, Belinda Davis, Hillary Kane, Eric Hamell, Margaret Neary, Mike “Georgy” Georgeson, James Robertson, Murielle McCarthy, Scott McCarthy, Jake Biando, Anne Johnson, Ian McShea, Seth, Chris Robinson, Ernest Schulte, Alex Gillett, Jeff Stanley, Emily Wyner, Charles Sherrouse, Mark Heacock, and Charles Neary

There were no additions or amendments to the agenda. All present introduced themselves.

Announcements included the following:
–Provisional screening of the documentary The Red Pill on 12/8; sign up at tugg.com by 6:30 p.m. on 12/1, to make it happen
–Meeting of the PHL Solidarity Committee, Sat. 12/3, 1-3 p.m., Arch St. United Methodist Church, https://www.facebook.com/PHLSolidarityForum/
–Tentative end-of-year event for GPOP; keep your eyes out for specifics, and contact Belinda, bedavis@rutgers.edu, if you would like to help plan something.
–Internal elections for GPOP City Committee (chair, treasurer, membership secretary, recording secretary, and three at-large positions) to take place (as every year) over the two monthly membership meetings on January 25 and February 22, 2017; details to follow, via the listserv and social media
–Green Party of Pennsylvania (GPPA) quarterly meeting in Harrisburg, 1/28 – 29/’17; details to follow

Discussion of electoral politics.
Chris Robinson gave a report on the Electoral Operations Working Group, which currently consists of 19 people. This group helps get Greens out to polling sites on (and before) elections, to distribute literature, etc. They also seek out members interested in running for electoral office. For 2017, this will include city comptroller, district attorney, and also inspectors of election, for which we currently have an elected Green in one set of divisions.
Sheila Ptah indicated interest in running as comptroller; Olivia Faison likewise as an inspector of election.
We also discussed possibilities for the development of a party apparatus of neighborhood leaders (something like “ward leaders”).
Green Party candidates won enough votes in Pennsylvania in the November election to regain state ballot access. This means “Green” will appear as a choice for party affiliation on voter registration forms (electronic and ultimately also paper). Greens can also run in special elections without an onerous burden of signatures.

Hillary Kane noted: when registering as Green on paper voter registration forms, where the choice is still only to write it in, it is very important to write just “Green” and not “Green Party”!
Andy Cook observed that it was far more politically significant to register as “Green” rather than as “Independent.” Olivia emphasized that it would be well worth figuring out how to audit elections more broadly, even beyond the Stein/Baraka campaign’s current presidential recount effort. Ian observed the usefulness of the Committee of 70, including in terms of familiarizing ourselves with our own wards.

Moving beyond electoral politics.
The main topic of the evening. Ian McShea proposed the establishment of an Organizing Working Group; Andy Cook, Amanda Joachim, Galen Tyler, and Belinda Davis registered their interest. Others interested should please contact Ian (ianmcshea-at-gmail.com) at their earliest convenience. Assantewaa suggested that the Trump election should act as a call for social justice advocates to be that much more engaged in politics, not just at election time, and that we ourselves need to move on this, on a range of local issues.

Galen and Hillary noted the value of having a short-, medium-, and longer-term “game plan”—and of working to prevent burn-out. James Robertson suggested there could be use in a strategic analysis, assessing the work of GPOP in the recent past, to determine what has worked more and less well. All agreed on the principles of working where people were, on what people were concerned about. There was also wide support for the idea of coalitioning with other active groups (such as Reclaim Philly, the Solidarity Forum, DecarceratePA, Friends of the Wissahickon, etc., etc.), with individuals acting as liaisons between GPOP and other groups; with getting out to others’ activities as well as planning our own (also with other groups); of “being seen being Green”; and of taking the stance of learning from other groups, as well as offering our own experience. Specific issues mentioned included protest alongside 350.org against the natural gas plant proposed for Nicetown; replacement of the School Reform Commission (SRC); and removal of children from their homes effectively because of their parents’/caregivers’ poverty; and other still more local issues.

Primary importance of outreach.
James addressed pre-election activities of the Outreach Working Group (including a park clean-up, BBQs, flyering), and emphasized the need for updated GPOP literature. Assantewaa noted the value of having literature in Spanish as well as English, and possibly in other languages. Ian and Willem both noted their Spanish language abilities. Georgy Georgeson pointed out the importance of focusing on non-voters: those who have given up on what they perceive to be the limits of political expression and choices. Olivia mentioned participating in neighborhood block parties as one means to get out the word. Sheila suggested putting lawn signs up now, precisely with the election over, and also the importance of “tabling,” and otherwise making oneself available to answer questions about being Green.
Galen said that, for Greens to be strong in Philadelphia, they have to look like Philadelphia. He noted that many of those present came from northwest Philly (e.g. Germantown), and suggested that that could be one good place to start.

Taj Magruder offered to found a Communications Working Group, which would also work on explaining the party and its activities to people of different identities (ethnic, class, gender, sexual, religious, etc.). Please contact Taj Magruder, if you are interested: tcm5116-at-gmail.com. He spoke of the importance of developing our social media presence (as well as reaching those not on social media).
Murielle reinforced the usefulness of developing various “scripts,” and suggested the usefulness of trainings to approach different audiences — including former Bernie Sanders supporters. This included some of those present, Emily Wyner reminded us, who are still seeking more information to make their decisions, and suggested we try working with focus groups.

We reviewed the Greens’ international Four Pillars (Ecological Wisdom, Social Justice, Grassroots Democracy, and Nonviolence), and the U.S. Greens’ additional six (Decentralization, Community-Based Economics, Feminism, Respect for Diversity, Personal and Global Responsibility, and Future Focus/Sustainability), totaling Ten Key Values. These are also listed on the little information cards that Alia Rahman has developed for GPOP, some of which were distributed at the meeting. Belinda also has more; contact her at bedavis-at-rutgers.edu, if you want some right away.

The discussion closed with an emphasis on the importance of moving ahead quickly now, without losing momentum (while also trying not to burn out!). Mark Heacock, who reported on the strong turnout at recent Green meetings in New Jersey, suggested that this was a primary concern also for those Greens.

Hillary Kane gave the treasurer’s report, noting a current balance of $1456.46 in our account. Over $160 was then collected at the meeting.

Respectfully submitted,
Belinda Davis, GPOP Recording Secretary
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Green Party Elects New Philadelphia Leadership

Posted in General Meetings, News on Mar 12, 2016 with Comments Off on Green Party Elects New Philadelphia Leadership

By Chris Robinson.

On February 24, 2016, members of the Green Party of Philadelphia (GPOP) energized their local party by electing a new leadership. Meeting at the Ethical Humanist Society on Rittenhouse Square, registered green activists listened to candidate remarks and then cast secret ballots.

New GPOP City Committee (plus one friend)

The new Chair of the Philadelphia Greens will be Galen Jah Tyler, who was a Member-at-Large of the City Committee for the last two years. Tyler said, “I plan to kick off introductory meetings for registered Greens. These monthly social events will help unite our members and educate them about the role of the Green Party as the main opposition to the two corporate parties.” Tyler, who lives in Torresdale (Ward 65), is director of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union and a founding member of the Poor Peoples Economic Human Rights Campaign.

Charles Sherrouse was elected as a new City Committee Member-at-Large. He said, “My priority will be getting Greens involved with ballot access petitioning across the city, and extending our campaign outreach to campuses. The Green Party’s performance in the 2015 City Council race has earned us state recognition as a political party in Philadelphia, which can help boost our membership.” Sherrouse lives in Oxford Circle (Ward 54), and he was a founding member of GPOP, having served on the City Committee more than a decade ago.

Green Party members are prepared for Sherrouse’s initiative. They formed an Electoral Operations Working Group in 2015 with three tasks: recruiting candidates for electoral office, organizing registered Greens to work on those campaigns, and creating a campaign infrastructure.

The Green Party members also elected Belinda Davis as GPOP Recording Secretary. Davis said, “I will focus not only on electoral politics, but also on bringing people together in political action that champions social justice, ecology, grassroots democracy, and non-violence.” She was referring here to the Green Party’s Four Pillars. Davis first became active with GPOP in 2004, working on a campaign for Philadelphia City Council. She lives in Chestnut Hill (Ward 9), and had been treasurer of GPOP during 2011 and 2012.

The other four members of the Green’s leadership were re-elected, some to new offices. Hillary Kane retained her seat as Treasurer, and Julian Robinson was re-elected as Member-at-Large. Kane and J. Robinson both live in Cedar Park (Ward 46). Eric Hamell was re-elected to the GPOP City Committee, this time as Member At Large, while Chris Robinson was returned in a different capacity as Membership Secretary. Both Hamell and C. Robinson live in Germantown (Ward 59).

The Green Party is an independent political party founded on the four pillars of nonviolence, grassroots democracy, ecological wisdom and social justice. For more information about the Green Party or to become a member, please call 215-843-4256 or email gpop@gpop.org.

This has appeared in:
Philly Free Press, Green Party of Pennsylvania website, Green Party of the U.S. website, GPOP NEWS, GPOP Chat, Northwest Greens, OpEdNews, sNEWSi, American Palestine Public Affairs Forum, and Green Party Watch.
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About Us

Posted in on Oct 22, 2009 with No Comments →

The Green Party of Philadelphia is both a political party and a grassroots political activist organization. All are welcome to join. We are an association of citizens who strive to make our city a more just and sustainable community. We work through education, direct action, and inclusive electoral politics.

The Green Party is an officially recognized political party in Pennsylvania and is one of the only parties that is actually growing.  As with Greens throughout the United States and the world, we are guided by the Four Pillars and Ten Key Values.

Our structure is detailed in our bylaws and is grounded on democratic principles. We strive to make decisions by consensus or by carefully delegated authority. The highest body in the organization is the General Membership. Most of the day-to-day work is performed by the Working Groups, volunteers, and the City Committee. We have recently compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about GPOP and the Green Party in general.

General Membership

All registered Green voters in Philadelphia are automatically members of the Green Party of Philadelphia, but we encourage you to fill out the membership form. At the very least, join one of our e-mail lists. If you have questions concerning membership, send an email to gpop@gpop.org or call 215-843-4256 and ask for Chris Robinson, the GPOP Membership Secretary.

Working Groups

You do not have to be a member of the Green Party in order to participate in a working group! Our working groups carry out the bulk of our activist and political work.

City Committee

The City Committee is responsible for general administration of the organization and implementation of the decisions of the membership as a whole, particularly between monthly General Membership meetings.

Contact Us

Please feel free to Contact the Green Party of Philadelphia to volunteer or for more information! Call 215-843-4256 or email gpop@gpop.org

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